Hiking, snowshoeing , cross-country skiing, mountain biking, horseback riding.

Part of the Eastview, Cobb Hill, Jane Greene trail system. All individually covered. Check them out.

The trail is well marked.

The beginning of spring can be very brown in NH so it is always delightful to see the first bursts of green.

The hobblebush is so named because its long branches have been known to trip people and hobble them. It blooms in May. Edible, red berries appear in August and ripen to deep purple in September. Leaves change from bronze-red to purple in fall

False Hellibore is notable for its toxicity – its leaves, roots, and stem are poisonous and cause vomiting. Although a pretty, early green, sight in spring. Some Native American tribes were known to chose their chief by who could eat it and not get sick. Having no desire to be an Indian chief, I walked away.

Soon, the trees will fill in and the glimpses of North Pond will hide away.

But there are still areas where a Rusty Red can get his requisite dip.

This trail will be a peaceful walk in the woods once the trees come out. A bit stark the end of April.

There are a lot of interesting rock formations. One benefit of the lack of leaves.

Small streams which meander toward North Pond were sliding over moss and leaves.

And vernal pools were still hosting a wealth of inhabitants.

The bog and swamp don’t show up on the Harris Center map. Such a wonderful habitat. And a surprise toward the end of the trail where it joins the woodland section of Jacquith Rd. A left turn will take you to the Cobb Hill trail linking to the Jane Greene.

And what Harris Center trail would be complete with out the Harris Center spider trees?

I am not an artist. But, journalling is therapeutic.

Thank you John Muir Laws for inspiring me to journal.