Hiking, snowshoeing x country skiing.

Dogs on leash please as lots of wildlife.

What a delight. Parking for many at the trailhead off Rte 137.

There is a kiosk with helpful information, a found hat, and a few other finds.

The trail is easy. Would be fantastic for children as you shall discover. I met a man walking with two canes. Not trekking poles, canes. He told me it was a lovely walk and told me he enjoyed all of the hour plus it took him to navigate slowly along. There seemed only one rough spot, but believe strollers could probably make it through.

The trail for the most part is open, and easy walking.

The left trail took us along a swampy, vernal pool ladenned with all manner of singing reptiles and aquatic bugs.

Due to dogs on leash, the critters seem pretty tame.

Spider trees.

I am fascinated by the power and perseverience of Beavers.

The beavers here are incredibly busy. 😉 There are many dams along this route leading to Dinsmore pond.

The view along Dinsmore is beautiful. There are a couple of pull offs down to the water for better viewing.

Dinsmore eventually flows into Nubanusit river, after another Beaver dam.

The water is crystal clear. Tempting, but would not recommend drinking it. Beaver water not always good for one’s digestion.

As we neared the Nubanusit we saw two mallard couples. There are otters here but hikers we met confessed they had sent them into hiding.

The Army Core of Engineers manages this area as flood control as part of the MacDowell Dam. http://www.nae.usace.army.mil Across the river is the 700 acres of the  Sargent Center.

Just some interesting shots along the river.

I am not an artist. But journalling is therapeutic.

Thank you John Muir Laws for inspiring me to journal.